How To Make It as a
First-Time Entrepreneur

How to Make it as a First-Time Entrepreneur

Hustling from our shared workspace cubicles

Vinicius Vacanti is co-founder and CEO of Yipit. Next posts on how to acquire users for free and how to raise a Series A. Don’t miss them by subscribing via email or via twitter.

“So, what do you do?”

Ugh. I hated that question.

The truth was that we were trying to start a new venture but we hadn’t really made any progress.

But, instead of just muttering something, I would force myself to enthusiastically pitch our current struggling idea. They would nod along but the skepticism on their face was hard to ignore.

And, when I was done, they would sometimes hit me with: “So, is that your full-time thing?” Ugh. What that really meant was: you’re trying to tell me that you spend all your time working on that ridiculous idea?

The Grind

We left our finance jobs in the summer of 2007, and we worked really, really hard. By February of 2010, it had been over two and half years of hustling on no salary. What did we have to show for it? Nothing.

We hadn’t made a dollar of revenue. We had been rejected by every investor we talked to. We hadn’t been able to recruit anyone to join our team. We hadn’t gotten traction with any of our ideas.

We had failed to get more than 10K monthly unique visitors for Yipit for the last two years despite trying several ideas with it. We were going sideways:

On a personal level, my life savings was disappearing. I kept getting hit with late penalties on my credit card. Not because I didn’t have the cash to pay it, but because I just didn’t want to think about it. It was too depressing to look at my depleting bank account that I had worked so hard to build up. I remember withdrawing all the money from my 401K account and having to confirm that I did, in fact, understand the massive penalties I would incur for doing so.

In all honesty, I probably would have given up earlier. The only reason why I didn’t was out of loyalty to my co-founder, Jim, who had also quit his finance job. He had passed up many amazing job opportunities to work alongside me and I wasn’t going to quit on him.

Everything Changes

So, it’s now February of 2010, over two and half years since we started, and we have yet another idea: build an aggregator for the early but quickly growing daily deal industry. The idea was sound, timely and right up our alley since we had been doing local deal aggregation for the last 9 months.

And, in just three days, everything changed.

We launched the new idea in a three-day scramble, got some initial press, users loved it, and four months later raised $1 million from amazing investors. A year after that, we’ve raised $6 million, made real revenue, attracted hundreds of thousands of users, and recruited amazing people to join our team (we’re hiring! join us!). And, best of all, we’re just getting started.

So, what happened in those three days?

I’m convinced that if we had the idea for a daily deal aggregator back in 2007 or 2008 or even 2009, we wouldn’t have gotten traction because we would have messed it up.

But, after two and half years of failing and learning, we knew exactly what to do:

Now that I look back, I realize that I was wrong to think that we had nothing to show for two and half years of hustling. While we didn’t have outward signs of success, we had learned something very important: the art and science of starting a new venture. It took us almost three years to know what exactly we had to do during those three days.

And, so, to everyone out there who’s struggling and feels like they have nothing to show for it, I hope this post keeps you going. You’re learning every day. And, when the inspiration strikes, you’re going to be ready to pounce on it.

Vinicius Vacanti is co-founder and CEO of Yipit. Next posts on how to acquire users for free and how to raise a Series A. Don’t miss them by subscribing via email or via twitter.

  • http://www.adventurista.com/ Sarah Tavel

    awesome post, Vin.  You guys really rock; love the story.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Thanks Sarah!

      • Bruno

        Hi.  I attended your really great presentation at the i-lab at Harvard 2 days ago.  I was wondering if you could share the slides you presented.  Thanks.

  • http://www.shuttlecloud.com EduardoF

    Inspiring post. Thanks for posting Vin.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Thanks Eduardo! Like the new company name!

  • http://etagwerker.com etagwerker

    Thank you for this post, Vin! It’s very inspirational. 

    Love the title! 

    (“Timing, perseverance, and ten years of trying will eventually make you look like an overnight success.”)

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Thanks Ernesto!

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Thanks Ernesto!

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mikko-Sundman/754654810 Mikko Sundman

      I love the title, I’ve always hated term “Talented Singer” for same reason, 99% of the good young vocalists are so good because they sing their breath away day after day and practice like no-one else. Talent equals to learning a bit faster than non-talented, but same work is required nevertheless.

      Thank you for encouraging us, this post is spreading over the world now. Congrats for your business, good luck!

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mikko-Sundman/754654810 Mikko Sundman

      I love the title, I’ve always hated term “Talented Singer” for same reason, 99% of the good young vocalists are so good because they sing their breath away day after day and practice like no-one else. Talent equals to learning a bit faster than non-talented, but same work is required nevertheless.

      Thank you for encouraging us, this post is spreading over the world now. Congrats for your business, good luck!

      • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

        Agree

  • Anonymous

    Inspiring, Vin! Reading your blog since the time you gave us (Princeton students) a quick talk back in May 2011 in GA office :P 

  • http://warriorstrong.com Rob Cortez

    Very inspring. I can fully relate to that first paragraph. “So that’s what you’re doing full time?”

  • http://warriorstrong.com Rob Cortez

    Very inspring. I can fully relate to that first paragraph. “So that’s what you’re doing full time?”

  • David Cornelson

    I’m 5 years into my start up. I have about 100 customers, little traffic, and the same stares from people when I tell them what I’m doing. But I went to TechWeek in Chicago in August and got pumped up to forge ahead. I’m not doing it full time, since I can consult and make good cash. But I continue to work hard to become independent.

  • David Cornelson

    I’m 5 years into my start up. I have about 100 customers, little traffic, and the same stares from people when I tell them what I’m doing. But I went to TechWeek in Chicago in August and got pumped up to forge ahead. I’m not doing it full time, since I can consult and make good cash. But I continue to work hard to become independent.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      I have so much respect for people who try to build something in their spare time. So much harder.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      I have so much respect for people who try to build something in their spare time. So much harder.

  • Anonymous

    Thank You! 

    I left a career as a biochemist and have turned down several opportunities to have a nice paycheck. In reality, I’m happier than ever, but some days the doubt creeps in and reading posts like this remind me why I must start something myself.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Best decision I ever made.

  • http://tropicmint.com Brooks

    This is exactly what I’m going through.  I’m really glad to hear you guys are doing well and it’s paying off.

    After finishing the Fox Sports iPhone app at the beginning of the year, I struck out on my own to create Macropon as a general daily deals site.  Seeing how crowded it is getting we decided to shift to TropicMint in the past few weeks to target the high-end market.

    I wish you all the success in the world, Vin.  You deserve it.

    Cheers.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Good luck with TropicMint!

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Good luck with TropicMint!

  • http://www.vinatta.com Geir Kiste

    Very inspiring story, always happy to read my daily dose of encouragement!

  • http://www.facebook.com/danvoell Dan Voell

    Great post!

  • azulum

    it’s really sad that the majority of people believe that believe that a man’s job == the man (this is obviously not true for women because women belong at home with the kids†).  even in this enlightened age, if you don’t have a “jobbie-job” with a 401k and a crappy health insurance or aren’t already rich (or seem that way), you are a drag on society.  so indignity of indignities, while jobs have ceased to be the safety net and higher education is no guarantee against joblessness—meaningful or not—many who have slaved through school by mortgaging their future to salliemae find themselves in equal standing with high school dropouts with the added benefit of massive debt and the knowledge that they now know less than they thought they did when they were younger.

    †the trouble with the feminist movement was not that it has helped empower women—who have yet to reach parity with men in many fields that are not constrained physically just because the lead times for that change spans a few lifetimes—but that the gender neutral ways of referring to both men and women and everything in between and on the periphery are either ugly, clunky, or just plain unpronounceable (i’m lookin’ at you s/he).

    • HS

      Yeah, like they say you can’t hope to find new land without willing to lose sight of the shore for a very long time. Glad you lived to tell the story.

    • http://www.thebigpropertylist.co.uk James

      Its true, you are not your job, and you are not your clothes!

  • Andy Sansone

    Great story. Congrats to you and your continued growth!

  • Andy Sansone

    Great post. Congrats to you guys! 

  • http://parttimeted.com Ted

    Post resonated with me completely. When you are new in business, you don’t always realize what you are doing wrong or about to do wrong until after you made the mistake.  You learn that your business model wasn’t the brilliant masterpiece you were so convinced of some time earlier.  You learn that you have a lot yet to learn.

    The persistent few though, of which group you guys obviously belong to, are willing to keep chugging along and keep learning (much like Tom Edison).  Then one day the hard work starts paying off when you come across an idea that finally fits into your life like that long lost last piece of the cardboard puzzle that had been missing for years.

    I love to read about real stories from people like you guys who end up winning in the end because you deserve it. I hope you guys really hit this one out of the park.  Sounds like you have got a pretty good swing so far.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Just want people out there to know that, while they are failing, they do have something to show for it: they’re learning.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Just want people out there to know that, while they are failing, they do have something to show for it: they’re learning.

  • http://www.webieu.com Puru Choudhary

    A lot of the times I can see that I am entering the low phase and often begin to wonder if whatever I am doing is even going anywhere. I realize that the phase is temporary and it will take time before I see any results. Posts such as these reaffirm my belief and help me during low times. 

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Just make sure you’re learning.

  • http://twitter.com/L1AD LIAD

    Strong Post.

    I wrote a similar post called ‘An Entrepreneurs Tale’ - 

    http://liad.tumblr.com/post/10132595139/an-entrepreneurs-tale-never-give-up

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      thanks for sharing.

  • http://instantcarinsuranceonline.com Ian

    Really inspiring story. I’m going through many of the same issues working on my own websites. I’s be happy with 10% what you’ve managed to accomplish ‘overnight’.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      I would have said the exact same thing in February of 2010. As you make progress though, it’s human nature to keep striving higher.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      I would have said the exact same thing in February of 2010. As you make progress though, it’s human nature to keep striving higher.

      • Steve

        Yes, successful outcomes equals confidence that you can go on, and motivation to keep doing it, I think that is what Eric Ries is saying when he preaches that units of learning should be a startups measurement. Everytkme you can say “I learned this…”, it’s much better for your emotions than saying “that didn’t work, I’ve failed etc”. And as you have demonstrated, persistence is what you need to succeed, because reality takes longer than your dreams. Thanks

  • http://www.civicsponsor.org/ Russ Wallace

    So true…was just talking with a founder this morning about this. He worked 3 years on his product, was worried about everything falling apart every day, and then he was acquired this past July.

    The emotional part of starting a company is so damn hard. Good to hear folks sharing the truth about how you become an “overnight success.”

  • http://www.civicsponsor.org/ Russ Wallace

    So true…was just talking with a founder this morning about this. He worked 3 years on his product, was worried about everything falling apart every day, and then he was acquired this past July.

    The emotional part of starting a company is so damn hard. Good to hear folks sharing the truth about how you become an “overnight success.”

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      It really is tough to deal with the emotions.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      It really is tough to deal with the emotions.

  • Howie Liu

    Nice guys ;).  Great post and keep killing it.

  • http://www.clipik.com Pablo Lema

    Always refreshing to hear the Yipit story, literally building your own success.  A great thing for us entrepreneurs to aspire to.  Valeu Vinicius and team!

  • http://twitter.com/bosconference Business of Software

    Great story and congratulations. 

    I love this story. Reminds me of the tale of overnight success that Peldi, the founder of Balsamiq told at last year’s Business of Software conference. Two great slides showing his ‘overnight success’ in context here: http://thebln.com/2010/10/giacomo-peldi-guilizzoni-business-of-software-how-ceos-can-embrace-their-worry/

    You can see the video of the talk and a transcript here if you want to. http://blog.businessofsoftware.org/2011/08/do-worry-be-happy-peldis-brilliant-talk-about-keeping-sane-as-a-software-ceo-video-transcript.html

  • http://twitter.com/MarkLittlewood Mark Littlewood

    Great story and congratulations. 

    I love this story. Reminds me of the tale of overnight success that Peldi, the founder of Balsamiq told at last year’s Business of Software conference. Two great slides showing his ‘overnight success’ in context here: http://thebln.com/2010/10/giacomo-peldi-guilizzoni-business-of-software-how-ceos-can-embrace-their-worry/

    You can see the video of the talk and a transcript here if you want to. http://blog.businessofsoftware.org/2011/08/do-worry-be-happy-peldis-brilliant-talk-about-keeping-sane-as-a-software-ceo-video-transcript.html

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Love that second slide taking into account his success in the context of his life.

  • http://makingmoneywithandroid.com/ David Webb

    Great story, and definitely true that experience is extremely valuable, no matter what else you have to show for your time. Thanks for the inspirational post!

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      That’s right. The main point I was trying to make is that, even if you’re failing, the experience is really valuable.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      That’s right. The main point I was trying to make is that, even if you’re failing, the experience is really valuable.

  • http://StartupLessonsLearned.com Eric Ries

    Awesome post. This is what I mean when I say that learning is the true unit of progress for startups. This is a great illustration. 

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Thanks Eric for sharing the lean startup methodology with so many of us. I don’t think we would have made it otherwise.

      • http://www.tvidesigns.com Mahdad Taheri

        And I just got Eric’s book today in the mail. Woohoo. I don’t want to work just want to read it. Then WORK! Love this post Vinicius. You’ve always been great at sharing your story. Keep it up. I have a few incredibly smart friends working on projects that are going through the same hurdles. You give hope they will find the way. I’ve experienced the same challenges too myself on some ventures but I’m confident with yours, Eric’s and other entrepreneur’s shared lessons the dream will become a reality one day soon!

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Thanks Eric for sharing the lean startup methodology with so many of us. I don’t think we would have made it otherwise.

  • http://jayliew.com Jay Liew

    great stuff, thanks for sharing!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/a.f.garcia.martinez Antonio Garcia-Martinez

    If you ran your startup in SF, no one would ask you the asinine questions you led off with. Greetings from the Bay Area, Antonio (formerly of AdGrok).

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      In fairness to New York, that was 2008. It’s not like Silicon Valley yet, but people are much more encouraging of people working at startups.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      In fairness to New York, that was 2008. It’s not like Silicon Valley yet, but people are much more encouraging of people working at startups.

  • http://www.facebook.com/AuthenticDelicacies Hanif

    Good article:$

  • http://www.upondo.net Upondo

    Interesting Article, showing really what may be the result of (in)correct timing in relation to the state of the society (market). Funny is, if you look back into dot com crash around millenium, most of the startups had a similar situation: either wrong timing or market or both. (This is the reason why you see so many startup-ideas working out OK, nowadays, in comparison to the late 90′s)

  • Admin R99

    amazing post :)

  • Winston Chen

    Amazing! I am on the way of my to create my venture. The story inspires me a lot. Thanks

  • Ronnie Brown

    Gosh this was so inspirational. My Uncle sent me this link. I felt the same way you guys felt two and a half years in. Thanks Alot. 

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Glad you liked it Ronnie!

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Glad you liked it Ronnie!

  • Anonymous

    The topic is just an exceptional one and I
    love this discussion. Thank you very much to highlight such a strong issue.
    This is really very motivating. I did not have any idea in this regard but your
    blog has opened up a wide array of information. Thank you very much and expect
    to have a few more in future.

    http://www.MyOwnPuzzle.com

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Yeah, I really like the discussion that takes place in the comments section. 

      • http://CRZ.net/ CRZ

        Especially the suspiciously spam-like comments generated by non-humans such as “jass85,” right? ;-) (But at least he got to plug his “marketplace” in a high traffic area for free!)

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Yeah, I really like the discussion that takes place in the comments section. 

  • Lars

    Great post, as usual. If things had gone really wrong, you could always have become a full-time writer/blogger, you do have the talent for that… Parabéns.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Ha! Obrigado.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Ha! Obrigado.

  • Ak

    so what exactly where you building before then? and so most of the initial traffic you got after pivoting was from PR your saying.

  • http://bloggerscompete.com Pavan Katepalli

    Hey Vin this is what I needed to read to get me back working on my start up. I got users, customers, but it’s not a stand alone business. It can’t run without a ton of effort. But I’ll continue and grind through it until we reach a 1000 users. We’re at 300 now.

    Also, my friend runs CrowdSeats.com (twitter.com/crowdseats) – a sports daily deals site. It’d be cool if Yip It could aggregate them into its emails.

  • http://twitter.com/crowdseats Justin Cener

    Pretty awesome that you are self-taught and built this with only ~3 years coding experience.  Definitely motivating to read about your persistence.  Sometimes, I feel as if I’m racing against an invisible clock and I feel overwhelmed by increasing traffic, users, revenue, deals, inventory, etc, etc everyday.

    Will 110% be attending Lean Starup Meetups in LA, hope they will lead me to the same path as Yipit!

  • http://www.shoreblend.com Nobu

    GooD Story! You go guys! A car runs on the gas. Entrepreneurs run on a story like this. 

  • http://kwIQ.eu James Ferguson

    This reads exactly how we will feel in a few months (we have spent a long time building a B2B concept and are beginning to find the sweet spot).  How the way forward leads we don’t yet know – but the sheer number of exciting ideas and potential wins is going exponential and we signed our first client last week (after 4 years of zero revenue !) – Encouraging – Yes definitely – Thank you

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for the encouragement. We’re just starting out. Congratulations!

  • http://twitter.com/the_deliman Rus

    This post is awesome. Informative and inspirational advice. Thanks.

  • Scott Jamieson

    Thanks for the validation.  Need an injection once in a while…

  • http://twitter.com/VoyageOfThought Kailas Simha

    I am a second time entrepreneur and I resonate with your thoughts completely! And I realize every time is different and a whole new experience!

  • http://twitter.com/VoyageOfThought Kailas Simha

    I am a second time entrepreneur and I resonate with your thoughts completely! And I realize every time is different and a whole new experience!

  • http://retinapost.com Den

    I also worked hard on my product http://RetinaPost.com based on good initial feedback. I launched it two weeks ago, and now I predict that convincing people to use it (even if it’s free) will not be easy.I also have other great ideas but I am afraid that I will lose much time on implementation and then have the same problem: bringing people attention.

  • http://twitter.com/scrollinondubs Sean Tierney

    Great post. The analogy I always use: think of a startup like hiking. You can only see the hilltops in immediate view at any given time. You have to get up to the top of one of those first in order to locate the distant summit perviously obscured by the hills. And even if you have to head back down into a valley, you HAD to get that vantage point to ever discover where the mountain was. 

    Congrats on Yipit’s success.  BTW Slide 11 of this talk I did for Kauffman Foundation has an illustration of this concept: http://www.scrollinondubs.com/2010/03/31/product-dev-takeaways/

  • http://twitter.com/juddm Judd Morgenstern

    Inspiring and reassuring post! Especially after you have one of those what-am-I-doing-with-my-life days. Keep up the great posts.

  • http://www.davidadamojr.com David Adamo Jr.

    This post definitely keeps me going. Thanks.

  • Level Group

    Fantastic post Vinicius.  As we have been building http://www.levelgroup.com  into the premier, alternative real estate brokerage platform in NYC, my partner and I have been talking about this exact idea for years – that no one truly emerges from no where, that we all slog away in relative obscurity until one day you arrive on the scene as the “next new thing” when in fact, you’ve been there working on this thing for years.  

    Thanks for the inspired message!

  • Level Group

    Fantastic post Vinicius.  As we have been building http://www.levelgroup.com  into the premier, alternative real estate brokerage platform in NYC, my partner and I have been talking about this exact idea for years – that no one truly emerges from no where, that we all slog away in relative obscurity until one day you arrive on the scene as the “next new thing” when in fact, you’ve been there working on this thing for years.  

    Thanks for the inspired message!

  • Level Group

    Fantastic post Vinicius.  As we have been building http://www.levelgroup.com  into the premier, alternative real estate brokerage platform in NYC, my partner and I have been talking about this exact idea for years – that no one truly emerges from no where, that we all slog away in relative obscurity until one day you arrive on the scene as the “next new thing” when in fact, you’ve been there working on this thing for years.  

    Thanks for the inspired message!

  • MarketingZone.com Editor

    Great post!  THANK YOU for sharing this.  Congratulations on making it through the eye of the needle. 

    Some observations:

    1.  The media and social media posts by people buzz about the “instant mega success stories” and “home runs” and the companies that are most “popular” (not profitable).   Same way someone who wins the lottery gets noticed. 

    2.  The media and social media posts buzz about what’s new and cool, not the majority of businesses out there who are profitable or the start-ups putting one step in front of the other trying to figure out what works, what doesn’t and how to make it to profitability.

    3.  The extremes get the coverage and buzz – the “high highs” and the “low lows”.  What’s also missed is that what goes up, must come down…and that many of the “instant success” businesses are a fad.   Groupon is a perfect example. 

    4.  Starting and running a small business is a lot like sailing – you have to pay attention to where the wind is and adjust to catch it when it comes your way and in the meantime, endure a lot of tacking back and forth to make slow, steady progress.  Helpful to have a paddle (or motor) on board for when the wind isn’t at your back.  And to have a crew that doesn’t get sea sick during the voyage and instead views rough seas as an adventure.

    5.  If you think you can, you can.  If you think you can’t, you can’t. 

    6.  It is better to be in the game than sitting on the sidelines even when you get all bruised up.  You can’t get a touchdown unless you’re on the field. 

    Enough musing.  Back to work for me. 

  • Nick

    Thank you…thank you.

  • Nick

    Thank you…thank you.

  • http://www.caycon.com Akira Hirai

    Unless you’re a rock star or just plain lucky, 2-1/2 years of Ramen and Kraft Mac-n-Cheese sounds about right from my personal experience also. They say it takes 10,000 hours to master something, and entrepreneurship is no different. In your case, it sounds like 80 hours/week x 50 weeks x 2.5 years = 10,000 hours. Nice work, guys!

  • http://twitter.com/HiDanielG Daniel Gonzalez

    Wow I’m like in the same place. I don’t have anything to show for my work, but I’ve read the 4 steps to the epiphiny, ash maurya’s running lean, entrepreneurs guide to cust dev. I now now how to make mock ups like no ones business. I’ve become masterful at optimizing conversions on a website, but I don’t have an idea worth a shit. Lol. I recent;y read the book Positioning Battle for the Mind. I think that gave me a pretty good idea of how to use a market focused approach to starting something people want. It’s bee an interesting journey, and I now have 2 ideas I feel are worth something. The hard part is digging deep and starting the customer development process again. 

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      I always found the hardest part of customer development was finding out that your idea might not actually be good.

  • http://twitter.com/sandman_va Dave Sandrowitz

    Great stuff, but it makes me wonder…how much of the resulting success for any tech startups just comes down to timing?  What if you and Jim had a bit less money and could not afford to keep going until Feb 2010?  All of that effort expended, all that wisdom gained, and all that money out the door only to fall short of your goal.  Did you ever set a deadline for yourself, beyond which you would simply not continue?  How close did you get?

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      It’s a great question. We didn’t set a deadline but it felt like we were getting close.

  • http://www.cgeventures.com Christopher Erckert

    Great job guys. Ever since I read “Outliers: The Story of Success” by Malcolm Gladwell I’ve felt more comfortable in the run up to success before the success.

  • http://twitter.com/civisidedotcom Ken Seville

    I am in the beginning of a similar experience with our Guaranteed Interview Program for veterans. We have been doing it for a year but only now are people are seeking us out, and it has everything to do with being at the right place, at the right time, and with the right offer. 

  • http://twitter.com/timothyjoreilly Timothy OReilly

    Fantastic post. Thank you.

  • Pete

    It’s tough to keep the faith at present my main idea is languishing waiting for investment but i am very fortunate that i have been able to buy a company which has already a number of clients and has a great future. Thus i am using this to survive till i am able to relaunch my foodies concept but i am also really enjoying what i am doing and learning a lot about my self and my ability to run a company. reading about other peoples journey always helps…So thanks for a very good discussion.
    Pete Chief Roaster at Roastmaster UK http://www.roastmaster.co.uk

  • http://www.Spidvid.com Jeremy Campbell

    Very inspirational, love this success story, thanks so much for sharing it here! 

  • http://www.linkedin.com/in/melodykoh Melody Koh

    Thanks for the inspiring story, Vin! People need to know that it’s possible to build a tech startup coming out of finance as a 1st time entrepreneur- just need to hustle and not give up.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      People can build a startup coming from all backgrounds.

  • Aisensiy

    “I had taught myself web development over the last few years and Jim had taught himself front-end development. We didn’t need to find an outsourcer, we just quickly built it ourselves. ”
    I always think the capability to start up quickly is quite important. How fast your idea come ture much depends on your own programming skills, specially at the beginning of your own career.

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Very important to test your idea as quickly as possible.

  • http://www.ecigator.com/ Electronic Cigarette

    This post is awesome, Here is the CN version: http://huyouyou.blogchina.com/1202052.html , for all those starterups~

  • Papermillsurplus
  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Scott-Bridgman/4702417 Scott Bridgman

    Very inspiring post for those who are still working hard to get the spinning tires on the ground, myself being one of them.  Thanks Vin!

  • http://twitter.com/techlibido Saikat Ghosh

    Very encouraging, thank you for posting.

  • HediVB

    As an incipient first timer with an idea trying to grab in the dark for what’s a priority and necessary before I leap, just want to thank you for this awesome blog. Every post is informative and inspiring in the same breath, much appreciated keep up the good work. 

  • Tonia Torrellas

    WOW Vinicius!!
    This is extremely inspiring!! Although our products are completely different/ our “stories” are exactly the same. For those that are observing my development of a brand of reusable items, it’s hard for them to see(or for me to articulate) that this is all preparation for when It’s My Bag/It’s My B, Inc. gets that Big Break!! I have often said that we will soon be that seemingly “over-night” success; that took 2-3years to get to.
    All the best to you and yours for the New year & beyond!!
    Tonia
    http://www.ItsMyB.com

    • Toniat

      Vin,
      Thanks again for sharing your story.
      Fingers crossed for me & It’s My B. There has been “more positives than negatives” lately…seems like the “tide is turning”!!
      Fingers crossed…
      Tonia
      http://www.ItsMyB.com

  • http://twitter.com/charnewman Charlotte Newman

    Thank you so much for this post! My sister and I have been working for over a year on our venture. It’s inspiring to read a post about the entire life cycle of being an entrepreneur, not simply a high profile and lucrative exit. 

  • Herknight

     Thank you for the inspiration, Congratulations!!

  • http://darkorakovic.magntize.com/ Darko Rakovic

    Been at your blog for like an hour and just cant stop reading. Great insights! Thanx a lot man for sharing and keep up the good work!

  • http://www.onefootonsand.com/ Jason

    Stumbled upon this blog and I have to say I’m loving it a lot. As a non-techie going the DIY route, these series of posts are just the inspiration I need to continue plugging away at my CodeYear and Ruby courses. Thanks for the motivation!

  • http://www.webmentor.cr/ Marco

    Inspiring post mate. I am currently on the same crossroads as you are and took the same route regarding coding. I need ot learn it and do it myself. It saves costs and it safeguards my interests and ultimately, intellectual property I am working on.

    This is how I see it.

    Very inspiring.

  • marinalazarevic

    It is never too late to even read an inspiring article like this! I just found out abut you, your work and this blog and am so happy people like you exist!
    I am from Eastern Europe and there is not too much to read or learn from local guys so you can not imagine my happiness to read some honest and true experiences like this! It is great motivation!
    Is there any platform to connect with people like you for mentoring? Any?? :)

  • http://twitter.com/alirtariq ARTariq

    I know this was posted 2 years ago, but the words in it still ring as true and inspirational as ever. I wonder if that surprises you.

    I love your blog and as a first-time startup co-founder, I feel rejuvenated every time I read it. Thank you!

    • http://viniciusvacanti.com Vinicius Vacanti

      Thank you for sharing your thought. It’s always nice to hear that people are getting use out of these posts.

  • Ian Chen

    Exciting story for me who like you to quit a finance job and working hard for my dream.

  • Antonio Moreda

    Excellent post, reminds me of Muhammad Ali’s quote: “The fight is won or lost far away from witnesses – behind the lines, in the gym and out there on the road, long before I dance under those lights.”